Creatives are Dangerous: MCA and Creative Works

MCA students and alumni descended on the inspiring Creative Works Conference this past weekend. The three-day event featured dozens of influential design, branding, digital, and storytelling experts. Creative minds from all over the country came to share their stories and listen to others, and MCA was there in the mix.

Advancement and Alumni Coordinator and MCA alumna Kristen Rambo helped the conference staff by working as a volunteer. Her long 15-hour days spent working at the conference were worth every minute though, especially with fellow MCA volunteers, alumni Ruby Zielinski and Lexie Shaunak and student Zoe Fitzhugh, shouldering the load.

“This is truly a grassroots conference, yet it feels so much larger,” Rambo says. “It was three days of talks, panels, workshops, market, snacks, and, most of all, building relationships and esteem.”

Senior Painting and Drawing major Baleigh Kuhar says, “the Creative Works Conference was the most inspiring experience I’ve ever had as a creative.” Kuhar appreciated hearing all of the speakers express the importance of personal projects, and seeing countless individuals who spoke of stepping out of their expertise and bringing their perspective and unique skill set to an unfamiliar medium. After a conversation with opening speaker Andy J. Pizza, Kuhar felt encouraged: “He confirmed my suspicion that I can do both fine arts and illustration. And I don’t have to start from scratch either. I can take what I know from my experience and create a niche market.”

The free artist market was open on Friday and Saturday, and included several MCA alumni, like Clare Freeman with Pretty Useful Co., Funlola Coker with Funlola’s Workshop, Kong Wee Pang and Jay Crum of Taro Pop, and Samilia Colar with Texstyle.

All in all, the conference was a whirlwind of creative activity that made a meaningful impact on its participants. To keep up with Creative Works and upcoming events, visit their website: http://www.creativeworks.co/

      


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