Course Descriptions

Select your Discipline/Concentration

Foundations

FD100 Drawing 1

(3 Credits)

Seeing/drawing skills are developed and sensitivity toward the aesthetics of form and space including linear perspective, mark making, value, line and line quality is explored. Students work in black and white media on a variety of papers from still-life, landscape and self-portrait. Foundation Core requirement; Offered in the fall and spring semester. Pre-reqs: None

FD110 Drawing 2

(3 Credits)

FD100 is continued with continued emphasis on mark making, full value studies, point-of-view selection, basic compositional ideas and space. Foundation Core requirement; Offered in the fall and spring semester. Pre-reqs: FD100

FD120 2-D Design

(3 Credits)

The vocabulary, premises and methods of visual events on the flat plane are explored through a series of lectures, experimental exercises and applied problems. Foundation Core requirement; Offered in the fall and spring semester. Pre-reqs: None

FD130 3-D Design

(3 Credits)

Volume, space organization, structure, texture, mass and tension are explored through a series of short projects using simple construction materials and techniques. Equipment use and safety instruction are included. Foundation Core requirement; Offered in the fall and spring semester. Pre-reqs: None

FD140 Idea, Process and Criticism

(3 Credits)

IPC investigates the development of ideas and concepts in art making. This course introduces strategies for the research, development, organization, analysis, presentation, documentation and criticism of individual artistic content. Product and technique will be de-emphasized in order to focus more attention on concept and process. A rigorous method of self-documentation will promote self-evaluation skills and disciplined improvement. Critique participation, writing and research will be as important as any finished artwork. Students will be encouraged to harness pre-existing technical skills and experience to serve their individual conceptual aims and to make artwork. Additionally, digital and analog strategies will be promoted, enabling students to take their concepts through a larger number of revision cycles. Foundation Core requirement; Offered in the fall and spring semester. Pre-reqs: None

FD160 Color Foundations

(3 Credits)

Recognizing that color is the most relative and temporary of art elements, this course seeks to remove color usage solely from the realm of intuition and instinct and put the student in the position of making informed decisions. This is an introduction to the principles of color mixing and design. It includes the most significant aspects of various figures in the history of color theory, however it is a studio class based on the actual experience of color. Students will develop a broad understanding of color principles and characteristics and their relationship to the other principles of visual art. Foundation Core requirement; Offered in the fall and spring semester. Pre-reqs: None

FD170 Digital Foundations

(3 Credits)

Digital methods meditate how we perceive, define and access and speak about art. Traditional art forms both incorporate and react against against these technologies. This component of the foundations curriculum addresses the practical and conceptual tools requisite for artists in the 21st century. Foundation Core requirement; Offered in the fall and spring semester. Pre-reqs: None

*Satisfactory completion of all Foundation coursework is a prerequisite for all courses beyond the introductory level within individual area concentrations.

Undergraduate Degree Programs

Animation

AN200 Introduction to Animation

(3 Credits)

Investigates the twelve core principles of animation along with the foundations of storytelling via animated cinematography; Conceptual development via storyboarding, craftsmanship, drawing skills for animation design, research, and deconstruction of master works are a large focus for establishing fundamentals. Animation major requirement; Offered in the fall and spring semester. Cross-listing: DM200; Pre-reqs: FD110, FD120 and FD170

AN225 2-D Animation

(3 Credits)

Development and execution of an animated short film within a small team of individuals; Explores industry practices, development of a visual language, and teambuilding skills; Drawing skills are refined through all stages of production, with audio development for animated storytelling as a focus throughout. Animation major requirement; spring semester. Pre-reqs: All foundation coursework and AN200

AN240 Drawing from Imagination

(3 Credits)

Introductory course in fundamentals of representational drawing for purposes of communication. Work done in various traditional media focusing on using light to define form and the figure. Variety of visual references utilized including photography, life, memory, and found sources. Animation major requirement; fall semester. Cross-listing: IL240; Pre-reqs: FD110, FD120 and FD170

AN270 Film Production

(3 Credits)

Course focus is on the art and craft of fiction and nonfiction visual storytelling for the screen: finding a topic, developing story structure, considering tone and execution, shooting, editing, and post-production to enact on an audience. Clarity of visual expression to serve a larger story theme is strengthened and the fundamentals of DSLR camera operation for stop motion, cinematography, basic lighting, and editing developed through the creation of short format projects. Animation major requirement; fall semester. Pre-reqs: All foundation coursework

AN325 Advanced 2-D Animation

(3 Credits)

Solo film creation is tackled with a collaborative twist, where the avenues of animation production are refined through critique, teamwork, portfolio development, internship research, and a critical eye for visual and storytelling quality within the medium. Advanced plot development and world building, volumetric representation of characters on film, perspective to enhance storytelling, effects animation, and masterful animation techniques. Animation major requirement; fall semester. Cross-listing: DM325; Pre-reqs: AN225/DM225

AN330 Post-Production and Editing

(3 Credits)

The artistic post-production practice of editing, and combining diverse animation sources to create a film that is greater that the sum of its individual parts; Compositing as an art form and the merits of multiple digital tools for film creation and refinement are investigated with respects to enhancing an artist’s visual language beyond a singular tool or technique. Animation major requirement; spring semester. Cross-listing: DM330; Pre-reqs: AN/DM225 and AN/DM270; or IL338 or POI

AN410 Advanced 3-D Computer Animation

(3 Credits)

Explores the methods used to produce character-animated shorts within a small team: Conceptual design for film, moving and acting in 3-D space, character rigging, organic modeling, advanced lighting, texturing, modeling, rendering, and compositing techniques. Animation major requirement; spring semester. Pre-reqs: DM/AN310

AN425 Experimental Animation

(3 Credits)

Investigating a wide variety of experimental techniques, students respond to assignment prompts reflecting alternative means of production and exhibition of media. Experimental animation practices, camera experimentation, live performance, projection mapping, and physical screen design inform processes. Students collaborate for a group exhibition for the final outcome. Animation major requirement; spring semester. Cross-listing: DM475; Pre-reqs: DM/AN270, or IL230, or POI

AN450 Senior Studio 1

(3 Credits)

Design and development of an individual senior project that highlights the conceptual and technical skills necessary to serve as the basis of a professional portfolio in preparation for graduating and seeking employment or advanced study placement in their area of specialized interest. Personal process, vision, and presentation skills are stressed. Animation major requirement; fall and spring semester. Cross-listing: DM400; Pre-reqs: Senior Standing

AN475 Senior Studio 2

(3 Credits)

Completion of an individual senior project that highlights the conceptual and technical skills necessary to serve as the basis of a professional portfolio in preparation for graduating and seeking employment or advanced study placement in their area of specialized interest. Students collaborate to design, promote, and present a group showcase exhibition of completed senior projects to peers, guests, and faculty. Animation major requirement; fall and spring semester. Cross-listing: DM405; Pre-reqs: AN450 or DM400

Digital Media

DM200 Introduction to Animation Techniques

(3 Credits)

The principles and history of animation are introduced. Working with digital programs as well as pre-cinematic toys, rotoscoping, and live pixilation, students explore “persistence of vision”—the process by which we perceive movement through still images. Students also gain a solid foundation in the history and techniques of animation through screenings and readings. Digital Media major requirement; fall and spring semester. Pre-reqs: All Foundation coursework

DM230 Dynamic Imaging 1

(3 Credits)

This course provides design strategies and techniques for creating time-based compositions using typography, video, sound and image sequencing. Through lectures, practical assignments and critiques students gain a technical command of After Effects Software as well as the conceptual skills necessary for pre-production planning, storyboarding, and design of digital motion sequences. Digital Media major requirement. Pre-reqs: All Foundation coursework, DM270

DM270 Digital Cinema 1

(3 Credits)

This course is an introduction to the elements of digital cinema production. Focuses are on directing, crew responsibilities, camera operation, lenses, lighting and sound recording. Beyond developing the basic skills necessary for field production, students also become proficient using the non-linear editing software Final Cut Pro. The basics of DVD creation using DVD Studio Pro including media capturing, video and audio encoding, interface design and testing are also introduced. Digital Media major requirement; fall semester. Pre-reqs: All Foundation coursework, DM105 or GD200

DM300 3-D Animation 1

(3 Credits)

This is an introductory course in stop-motion animation, a medium that requires a wide array of technical skills. We consider such techniques as sculpting, two-part molds, foam rubber casting, armature configuration, set design, and lighting for small spaces. Through motion and movement tests, students explore the ways in which three-dimensional objects move through space. Digital Media Elective Option. Pre-reqs: DM225

DM310 3-D Computer Animation

(3 Credits)

Students gain experience with creating 3D animation, including geometric modeling, lighting, camera angles, texture formation, skeleton rigging and motion in a three-dimensional animation package. Students learn underlying principles of 3D animation, including perspective, transformations, lighting and shadows, and modeling natural phenomena and motion.Digital Media Elective Option; fall semester. Pre-reqs: DM225, permission of instructor

DM325 Advanced 2-D Animation

(3 Credits)

Open to students who have completed DM225, DM250, or DM300, this course is an intensive workshop in which students create a finished animation in their preferred medium. Special attention is paid to realistic production goals, thorough pre-production and storyboarding, and sound design for animation. There are weekly critiques, and students are expected to spend significant time working outside of class to make the progress necessary to bring an animation project to full fruition. Digital Media Elective Option; fall semester. Pre-reqs: DM225, permission of instructor

DM330 Dynamic Imaging 2

(3 Credits)

The artistic post-production practice of editing, and combining diverse animation sources to create a film that is greater that the sum of its individual parts; Compositing as an art form and the merits of multiple digital tools for film creation and refinement are investigated with respects to enhancing an artists visual language beyond a singular tool or technique. Prerequisites: DM230

DM340 Digital Imaging 2

(3 Credits)

Students further their knowledge of the digital image and its development. The emphasis is placed on the students personal expression and understanding of the full potential of the image in digital and analog terms. A variety of advanced techniques and research are covered including issues of scale and custom color management. Digital Media Elective Option. Pre-reqs: DM240

DM355 Digital Printmaking 1

(3 Credits)

This is a truly interdisciplinary course combining digital imaging with printmaking processes and extends imaging options beyond the computer. The course focuses on the use of digital technologies to create hand pulled prints and hybrid prints using traditional and photo-printmaking processes mixed with giclee’ printing. The goal is to find a balance between the technical and the conceptual, the digital and the hand crafted, and to develop skills that allow the student to unite intent with production. Digital Media Elective Option. Pre-reqs: DM240, PM100 or PM105, Advanced Standing

DM360 Web Design 2

(3 Credits)

HTML and design skills are developed as they apply to the Internet. New technologies are explored and implemented. Case studies of design problems and artistic intent form the basis for projects. Digital Media Elective Option. Pre-reqs: DM260, DM420 or P.O.I.

DM370 Digital Cinema 2

(3 Credits)

This is an advanced level production course. Students are pushed to further develop the technical processes introduced in CA270. Special instructional emphasis is given to cinematography and lighting. Digital Media Elective Option. Pre-reqs: DM270

DM375 Sound Acquisition and Editing

(3 Credits)

This course focuses on audio as an art form in and of itself, as well as in the service of other mediums—video, animation, etc. We begin by exploring the fundamentals of acoustics: sound waves and how they travel; how microphones convert kinetic energy into an electrical signal; and how recording devices work. We then move on to sound acquisition strategies, including proper micing, field audio work, and foley recording. Students use the digital audio workstation to create original compositions, explore soundtrack design, and perform mix-downs. Digital Media Elective Option. Pre-reqs: DM105

DM400 Senior Studio 1

(3 Credits)

This course encompasses the conceptual and technical skills of the senior level student. Personal process, vision, and presentation skills are stressed. The development of works for the professional portfolio, and thesis is expected. Digital Media major requirement; fall and spring semester. Pre-reqs: Senior standing

DM405 Senior Studio 2

(3 Credits)

This course provides Animation and Digital Cinema majors the opportunity to complete a more in-depth final project. Digital Media major requirement; fall and spring semester. Pre-reqs: DM400

Graphic Design

GD200 Typography and Layout

(3 Credits)

Introduces the fundamentals of typography– its theory, practice, technology, and history for visual communication and problem solving. Examines type as form and language through the study of marks and symbols, page composition and hierarchy, type classification and identification, texture and contrast. Introduces grid systems and typesetting. Issues of legibility, readability, expression, and style will be discussed for print and digital formats. Graphic design major and concentration requirement; fall and spring semester. Pre-reqs: FD120 and FD170

GD205 Print Design and Production

(3 Credits)

Examines composition of type and image for print, beyond basic layout; expanding conceptual and technical skills; understanding historical context; to give shape to information and messages. Emphasis in strong foundation of graphic design process and craftsmanship of print production—file preparation, equipment, materials—for most standard 4-process color printing / offset printing. Explores alternative print techniques and methods. Environmental and economic sustainability will be discussed. Graphic design major and concentration requirement; spring semester. Pre-reqs: FD120 and FD170

GD260 Web Design

(3 Credits)

Stresses conceptual and technical skills required for designing and publishing structure and content in open-source web-based format. Introduces how web media differs from other media as mode of dissemination of information and messaging of visual communication. Teaches solid foundation of hand coding in XHTML and CSS. Builds strategies for productive and effective design work sequence and process. Environmental and economical sustainability will be discussed. Graphic design major requirement; fall semester. Cross-listing: DM260; Pre-reqs: FD120 and FD170

GD280 Human-Centered Design

(3 Credits)

Stresses design methods and process for problem finding and solving, emphasis on the role of users / people. Introduces methods, tactics, and tools for multiple phases of the design process; research, mapping, ideation, user testing, presentation, critique. Development of high-speed prototyping is emphasized. Considers implementation—production and distribution—within social contexts, including the consequences of work once it is released to function in society. Graphic design major requirement; spring semester. Pre-reqs: FD120, FD140 and FD170

GD300 Digital Design and User Interface

(3 Credits)

Examines graphic design for digital environments—desktop, tablet, mobile and beyond—with emphases on user interface / user experience (UI/UX) design; elevated user and market research; and in-depth problem finding and solving. Concepts such as usability, aesthetics/style, information architecture, navigation, structure, and functionality will be discussed. Introduces prototyping and presentation techniques to test and visualize dynamic, non-linear solutions. Development and management of project workflow schedules is expected. (no coding). Graphic design major and concentration requirement; fall semester. Pre-reqs: GD200 and DM/GD260

GD305 Environmental Graphic Design

(3 Credits)

Examines design communication, where typography takes on new dimensions and graphics are presented in an environmental context—Exhibition/events, tradeshow, retail, signage, wayfinding and other. Emphasis on complex combination of communication elements; space, time, movement, graphics, objects, and text. Stresses extensive research and analysis; practical and experimental problem solving skills. Development and management of project work flow schedules and professional-level discussions/presentation skills are expected. Issues of cross-platform sustainability will be discussed. Graphic design major and concentration requirement; spring semester. Pre-reqs: GD200 and GD205

GD310 Packaging Design

(3 Credits)

Examines how brands and products connect with consumers, influencing decisions to engage through form, graphics, color and typography. Areas of study include product safety and structure, packaging anatomy, marketing and environmental considerations, surface graphics standards, retail vs. distribution packaging. Introduces students to packaging design as an area of study and profession. Students practice 2D/3D prototyping skills and work with standard Adobe software; large format printing; complex folding systems. Graphic design elective; spring semester. Pre-reqs: GD200 and GD205

GD320 Advertising Design

(3 Credits)

Examines ads and ad campaigns as a specialization within the practice of graphic design that encompasses several overlapping disciplines: photography, illustration, typography, product design, marketing, and writing. Stresses how to position a product, service or social cause across multiple advertising strategies— print, digital, web, out-of-home and other—through individual and group project work. Emphasis on demographics, psychographics, and target audience to understand the consumer. Review of creative team structure and agency/client relationships. Graphic design elective; fall semester. Pre-reqs: GD200, GD205 and GD260

GD360 History of Design

(3 Credits)

Chronological survey of design through slide lectures and critical making; focuses on graphic design, contextualized by related disciplines, and how it responds to and affects political, cultural, and social changes since 1450. Emphasis on growth of consumerism from late 19th century to present. Investigates the role of technology and the emergence of web and digital design in contemporary forms. Graphic design major requirement; fall semester. Pre-reqs: AH101, AH102 and JR/SR Status

GD380 Advanced Visual Communication

(3 Credits)

Examines principles of type and image as visual communication and problem solving for the integrated campaign—print and/or digital media—in specialty area of interest. Issues of complex typographic structures and hierarchy, legibility versus readability, meaning and voice, page and screen will be discussed. End forms will be more emphasized, in part as evidence that craft and working methods are sufficiently evolved. Introduces graphic design in motion (non-interactive/time-based media). Graphic design major requirement; spring semester. Pre-reqs: GD200, GD205 and GD260

GD399 Special Topics Course

(3 Credits)

Junior Level. Courses offered infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject in Graphic Design that may be topical or of special interest. Several different topics may be offered per semester. A specific title will be used in each instance and will be apparent on the student transcript. Multiple offerings will be identified by the use of suffixes (A, B, C, etc). Graphic Design Elective. Pre-reqs: Jr/Sr Standing and POI

GD400 Brand and Identity Design

(3 Credits)

Examines concepts of branding and supports development of distinct identity system and expanded touchpoints across multiple platforms; working beyond basic logo design and its application; proposed by the student, self-directed and driven by specialty area of interest. Emphasizes strategic thinking; creating identity through the manipulation of language, materials, and experience. Guest critics are invited in the classroom throughout the course; professional etiquette and presentation are emphasized; issues of cross-platform sustainability will be discussed. Graphic design major and concentration requirement; fall semester. Pre-reqs: GD300 and GD305

GD405 Senior Project and Portfolio

(3 Credits)

Self-directed capstone project applying collective design knowledge and demonstrating comprehensive understanding of design process, craft; concludes with formal presentation with guest critics. Emphasis placed on refinement of previous work to create a strong portfolio package for career path after graduation; Resume/promotional materials are refined. Professional roles—agency, in-house designer, freelance, graduate studies—will be discussed; networking with local, regional, national organizations related to the graphic design field are emphasized/required. Graphic design major and concentration requirement; spring semester. Pre-req: GD400

Illustration

IL220 Visual Storytelling

(3 Credits)

Drawing and composition are essential tools of visual storytellers for the creation of narrative art. Storyboards, children’s books, and comic books are explored through traditional and contemporary tools and techniques. Visual storytelling skills developed by examining methodology and formal language of narration through assigned reading, discussions, and critical analysis. Writing and drawing intensive: heavy focus on Western Comic Book format. Pre-reqs: FD110, FD160 and FD170

IL230 Dimensional Illustration

(3 Credits)

Sculpt characters and environments for production as illustrations, stop action animation assets and gaming industry characterizations. Focus on conceptual illustration and craft. Processes are informed by basic sculptural practices that begin by drawing character sketches then building armatures. Characters and sets are photographed for final outcomes. Wire, polymer clay, cardboard, and other media used. Animation 3-D Elective Option. Pre-reqs: All Foundation coursework

IL240 Drawing from Imagination

(3 Credits)

Introductory course in fundamentals of representational drawing for purposes of communication. Work done in various traditional media focusing on using light to define form and the figure. Variety of visual references utilized including photography, life, memory, and found sources. Illustration major requirement; fall semester. Pre-reqs: FD110, FD120 and FD170

IL270 Drawing Imagined Space

(3 Credits)

Course focus is on exploration of space and perspective: constructing realistic illustrations of imagined scenarios to solve visual challenges. By merging imagery from various sources, investigating lighting, tonal value, and dimensionality, students create solid and convincing settings. Continued exploration of various traditional media and introduction to digital applications as they apply to illustration. Animation 2-D Elective Option; spring semester. Pre-reqs: IL240

IL299 Special Topics Course

(3 Credits)

Sophomore Level. Courses offered infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject in Illustration that may be topical or of special interest. Several different topics may be offered per semester. A specific title will be used in each instance and will be apparent on the student transcript. Multiple offerings will be identified by the use of suffixes (A, B, C, etc). Illustration Elective. Pre-reqs: offering specific

IL320 Comics: Developing Story and Character

(3 Credits)

Students develop an original script and a unique cast of characters for a 16 page comic book. Professional techniques are strengthened and personal styles are developed through the creation of engaging stories and interesting characters. Illustration with Comics major requirement; fall semester. Pre-reqs: IL 220

IL338 Digital Painting

(3 Credits)

This course is an introduction to digital painting techniques using industry standard software. There is a strong emphasis on visual development, figurative imagery, composition, color theory, craft. Course work includes drawing and painting digitally from a live model, creating master copies, speed painting, portraiture, and concept art such as character and background design. Animation 2-D Elective Option; spring and fall semester. Pre-reqs: SO standing or above, and FD170

IL339 Illustration and Type

(3 Credits)

Focus on visual hierarchy and tone of typography in conjunction with illustration to create successful and consistently well designed illustrative pieces. Overview of the fundamentals of typography, letterforms and origins, and page dynamics covered as they relate to the finished illustrated works. Students utilize digital skills with industry standard software as well as traditional illustration skills. Illustration major requirement; fall and spring semester. Pre-reqs: IL220 and IL270 and PD220

IL360 Conceptualization and Metaphor

(3 Credits)

This course places emphasis on idea generation, concept development and problem solving as it relates to Illustration. Smart visual innovation, articulation and expression are primary goals. Assignments are designed to reflect the scope of the field and include development of images for posters, editorial, business, and book illustration. A combination of digital and traditional media will be used. Illustration major requirement; fall semester. Pre-reqs: Il220, IL240, IL270 and PD220

IL365 Style and Vision

(3 Credits)

Encountering a wide variety of subject matter, students respond to assignment prompts reflecting the contemporary illustration marketplace. They are encouraged to develop unique approaches to solutions, showing integrity and authority in their visual speech by delving into style as it relates to and effects substance. Conceptualization with a high level of visual acuity is the main focus. Illustration major requirement; spring semester. Pre-reqs: IL360 and IL339

IL399 Special Topics Course

(3 Credits)

Junior Level. Courses offered infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject in Illustration that may be topical or of special interest. Several different topics may be offered per semester. A specific title will be used in each instance and will be apparent on the student transcript. Multiple offerings will be identified by the use of suffixes (A, B, C, etc). Illustration Elective. Pre-reqs: offering specific

IL410 Comics: Production and Print Publication

(3 Credits)

Using previously developed scripts and characters, students create a single long-form comic book and prepare the files for publication. Two hand-assembled editions of the comic book are prepared using traditional tools with focus on high level of craft. Digital file management for professional comic book production and publication techniques mastered and used to create two printed copies. Illustration with Comics major requirement. Pre-reqs: IL320

IL420 Comics: Serialization and Distribution

(3 Credits)

Weekly, serialized web comic developed for digital publication on a professional website. Original, previously created comics utilized or new stories and characters designed. Additionally, promotional materials such as prints, stickers, and T-shirts are produced, and can be developed as merchandise available through the web comic site. Illustration with Comics major requirement; spring semester. Pre-reqs: IL 410

IL460 Senior Studio: Business and Presentation

(3 Credits)

Mining areas of personal interest, students steer their portfolio towards an individual preference within the field of illustration. A self-directed series of related images on chosen subjects is developed. Additionally, the professional marketplace is explored in depth as each student chooses a specific focus to research culminating in semester end presentations. Illustration major requirement; fall semester. Pre-reqs: IL230 and IL365

IL465 Senior Studio: Portfolio and Marketing

(3 Credits)

Advanced students continue creating a personal and professional body of work in preparation for graduating and seeking work in their area of interest within the field of Illustration. This includes development of a portfolio, web representation, self-promotional materials, business and professional practices as they relate to the freelance and fulltime illustrator. Illustration major requirement; spring semester. Pre-reqs: IL460

IL499 Special Topics Course

(3 Credits)

Senior Level. Courses offered infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject in Illustration that may be topical or of special interest. Several different topics may be offered per semester. A specific title will be used in each instance and will be apparent on the student transcript. Multiple offerings will be identified by the use of suffixes (A, B, C, etc). Illustration Elective. Pre-reqs: offering specific

IL601 Illustration Seminar 1

(3 Credits)

Students meet collectively to discuss their graduate work and the professional practices involved in being a professional and educator. Group critiques are scheduled to encourage interaction between students and readings are assigned to provide context to contemporary trends. Enrollment is required in each semester a grad student is enrolled in the MFA in Illustration program. Lectures concentrate on documentation and web materials necessary to be a relevant artist/professional. MFA in Illustration major requirement. Pre-reqs: Enrollment in the MFA in Illustration program

IL602 Illustration Seminar 2

(3 Credits)

Students meet collectively to discuss their graduate work and the professional practices involved in being a professional and educator. Group critiques are scheduled to encourage interaction between students and readings are assigned to provide context to contemporary trends. Enrollment is required in each semester a grad student is enrolled in the MFA in Illustration program. Lectures concentrate on grant and residency opportunities and their application processes. MFA in Illustration major requirement. Pre-reqs: IL601

IL651 Illustration Workshop 1

(3 Credits)

Working independently from a traditional course- based process and from the other MFA candidates, this course is self-directed study, each student conducting his/her own personal exploration of concept and technique in the illustration process under the guidance of the faculty advisors. Student should demonstrate a willingness to take risks in their investigations. While a consistent body of work is not required, an openness to experimentation and the ability to succeed should be evident. MFA in Illustration major requirement. Pre-reqs: Enrollment in the MFA in Illustration program

IL652 Illustration Workshop 2

(3 Credits)

Working independently from a traditional course- based process and from the other MFA candidates, this course is self-directed study, each student conducting his/her own personal exploration of concept and technique in the illustration process under the guidance of advisors. Student should be able to articulate the pertinent issues in the work and a finished, resolved piece will be presented at finals. MFA in Illustration major requirement. Pre-reqs: IL651

IL701 Illustration Seminar 3

(3 Credits)

Students meet collectively to discuss their graduate work and the professional practices involved in being a professional and educator. Group critiques are scheduled to encourage interaction between students and readings are assigned to provide context to contemporary trends. Enrollment is required in each semester a grad student is enrolled in the MFA in Illustration program. Lectures concentrate on the research and documentation involved in a career in academia. MFA in Illustration major requirement. Pre-reqs: IL602

IL702 Illustration Seminar 4

(3 Credits)

Students meet collectively to discuss their graduate work and the professional practices involved in being a professional and educator. Group critiques are scheduled to encourage interaction between students and readings are assigned to provide context to contemporary trends. Enrollment is required in each semester a grad student is enrolled in the MFA in Illustration program. Lectures concentrate on fellowship applications and presentation skills. MFA in Illustration major requirement. Pre-reqs: IL701

IL751 Illustration Workshop 3

(3 Credits)

Working independently from a traditional course- based process and from the other MFA candidates, this course is self-directed study, each student conducting his/her own personal exploration of concept and technique in illustration under the guidance of advisors. Students are required to apply for Advancement to Candidacy when he/she will be expected to present a draft of their thesis and finished series of work. MFA in Illustration major requirement. Pre-reqs: IL652

IL752 Illustration Workshop 4

(3 Credits)

Working independently from a traditional course- based process and from the other MFA candidates, this course is self-directed study, each student conducting his/her own personal exploration of concept and technique in the illustration process under the guidance of the faculty advisors. Student will present a body of work in the MFA Thesis exhibition and a written thesis paper that will articulate their intentions, conceptual, aesthetic and technical strength. MFA in Illustration major requirement. Pre-reqs: IL751

Metals

MT200 Intro to Metalsmithing

(3 Credits)

Introductory level class exploring fundamental metalsmithing tools and processes necessary for all additional metals classes. Explores the creation of small sculptural units, body ornamentation, and utilitarian objects. Metals major requirement; Offered in the fall and spring semester. Cross-listing: SC150; Pre-reqs: FD130

MT250 Enameling and Surfaces

(3 Credits)

Exploration of Intermediate metalsmithing processes necessary for the surface treatment and manipulation of wearable, functional, and sculptural metal objects. Metals major requirement; spring semester. Pre-reqs: MT200

MT299 Special Topics Course

(3 Credits)

Sophomore Level. Courses offered infrequently to explore in-depth a comparatively narrow subject in Metals that may be topical or of special interest. Several different topics may be offered per semester. A specific title will be used in each instance and will be apparent on the student transcript. Multiple offerings will be identified by the use of suffixes (A, B, C, etc). Metals Elective. Pre-reqs: offering specific

MT300 Hollow Forms in Metal

(3 Credits)

Exploration of fabrication and hammer techniques as they relate to the production of utilitarian and wearable hollow forms in metal. This course stresses the importance of drawing and model making as it relates to presentation and critique. Metals major requirement; fall semester. Cross-listing: SC350; Pre-reqs: MT200

MT350 Wearable Art

(3 Credits)

Exploration of traditional and experimental body adornment utilizing found and fabricated materials. Metals major requirement; spring semester. Pre-reqs: MT200

MT400 Silversmithing

(3 Credits)

In-depth survey of silver as it relates to the studio metalsmith and the creation of wearable, utilitarian, and sculptural forms. Silver and precious metals are used traditionally and experimentally through student-developed curriculum. Students will work only with silver for the duration of this course. Metals major requirement; fall semester. Pre-reqs: MT200 or POI

MT450 Metals Studio

(3 Credits)

Systematic exploration of metal structures and invention through student directed themes. This course places an emphasis on developing individual research projects related to the BFA exhibition. Metals major requirement. Pre-reqs: MT400 or POI

MT601 Metals Seminar 1

(3 Credits)

Students meet collectively to discuss their graduate work and the professional practices involved in being a professional and educator. Group critiques are scheduled to encourage interaction between students and readings are assigned to provide context to contemporary trends. Enrollment is required in each semester a grad student is enrolled in the MFA in Metals program. Lectures concentrate on documentation and web materials necessary to be a relevant artist/professional. MFA in Metals major requirement. Pre-reqs: Enrollment in the MFA in Metals program

MT602 Metals Seminar 2

(3 Credits)

Students meet collectively to discuss their graduate work and the professional practices involved in being a professional and educator. Group critiques are scheduled to encourage interaction between students and readings are assigned to provide context to contemporary trends. Enrollment is required in each semester a grad student is enrolled in the MFA in Metals program. Lectures concentrate on grant and residency opportunities and their application processes. MFA in Metals major requirement. Pre-reqs: MT601

MT651 Metals Workshop 1

(3 Credits)

Working independently from a traditional course- based process and from the other MFA candidates, this course is self-directed study, each student conducting his/her own personal exploration of concept and technique in the illustration process under the guidance of the faculty advisors. Student should demonstrate a willingness to take risks in their investigations. While a consistent body of work is not required, an openness to experimentation and the ability to succeed should be evident. MFA in Metals major requirement. Pre-reqs: Enrollment in the MFA in Metals program

MT652 Metals Workshop 2

(3 Credits)

Working independently from a traditional course- based process and from the other MFA candidates, this course is self-directed study, each student conducting his/her own personal exploration of concept and technique in the illustration process under the guidance of advisors. Student should be able to articulate the pertinent issues in the work and a finished, resolved piece will be presented at finals. MFA in Metals major requirement. Pre-reqs: MT651

MT701 Metals Seminar 3

(3 Credits)

Students meet collectively to discuss their graduate work and the professional practices involved in being a professional and educator. Group critiques are scheduled to encourage interaction between students and readings are assigned to provide context to contemporary trends. Enrollment is required in each semester a grad student is enrolled in the MFA in Metals program. Lectures concentrate on the research and documentation involved in a career in academia. MFA in Metals major requirement. Pre-reqs: MT602

MT702 Metals Seminar 4

(3 Credits)

Students meet collectively to discuss their graduate work and the professional practices involved in being a professional and educator. Group critiques are scheduled to encourage interaction between students and readings are assigned to provide context to contemporary trends. Enrollment is required in each semester a grad student is enrolled in the MFA in Metals program. Lectures concentrate on fellowship applications and presentation skills. MFA in Metals major requirement. Pre-reqs: MT701

MT751 Metals Workshop 3

(3 Credits)

Working independently from a traditional course- based process and from the other MFA candidates, this course is self-directed study, each student conducting his/her own personal exploration of concept and technique in illustration under the guidance of advisors. Students are required to apply for Advancement to Candidacy when he/she will be expected to present a draft of their thesis and finished series of work. MFA in Metals major requirement. Pre-reqs: MT652

MT752 Metals Workshop 4

(3 Credits)

Working independently from a traditional course- based process and from the other MFA candidates, this course is self-directed study, each student conducting his/her own personal exploration of concept and technique in the illustration process under the guidance of the faculty advisors. Student will present a body of work in the MFA Thesis exhibition and a written thesis paper that will articulate their intentions, conceptual, aesthetic and technical strength. MFA in Metals major requirement. Pre-reqs: MT751

Painting/Drawing

PD200 Direct Painting

(3 Credits)

An introduction to the materials and techniques of direct or alla prima oil painting; includes working on and preparing various paint supports and basic traditional, direct oil painting techniques. Emphasis is on developing skills in paint handling and application through responsive direct observation, developing a surface, understanding and manipulating the material substance of opaque oil paint in a personally expressive manner to represent form, space and volume; a thoughtful employment of composition and color mixing while investigating the communicative potential of works executed in various direct painting approaches. Note: This course may be taken concurrently with PD 201. Painting/Drawing major and concentration requirement. Offered in the Fall and Spring semester. Pre-reqs: FD 100

PD201 Indirect Painting

(3 Credits)

An introduction to the materials and techniques of indirect oil painting, a multi-layered approach commonly executed over a monochrome under-painting; includes working on and preparing various paint supports and basic traditional indirect painting techniques. Emphasis is on developing skills in paint handling and application, understanding and employing the transparent quality of oil paint in a personally expressive manner to represent form, space and volume; thoughtful employment of composition and color mixing while investigating the formal and communicative potential of various indirect painting approaches. Note: This course can be taken concurrently with PD 200. Required course for Painting/Drawing major and concentration. Offered in the Fall and Spring semester. Pre-reqs: FD100

PD220 Life Drawing

(3 Credits)

An introduction to drawing the human figure from direct observation. Working from a live model in a responsive manner, students will investigate the human form through various techniques, media and approaches, including extensive practice in gesture drawing, planar analysis, proportional measuring and spatial relationships. Emphasis is on understanding the structure of the human figure and it’s representation within a space through the act of observational drawing. Advanced problem solving, the raising of conceptual and technical skill levels, and enhanced analytical thinking as they relate to the figure are essential parts of the class structure. Note: May be repeated 3 times (PD221/222/223) Painting/Drawing major and concentration requirement. Offered in the Fall and Spring semester. Pre-reqs: FD110

PD230 Drawing Composition

(3 Credits)

A further investigation of drawing and two-dimensional fundamentals with a concentration on developing personal and unique compositions: the organization, layout, and design of the picture plane. An introduction to the conceptual underpinnings of pictorial organization as a means to generate content and meaning. Underlying the assignments are various representations of space based on late 19th and 20th century precedents. Painting/Drawing major and concentration requirement. Offered in the Fall and Spring semester. Pre-reqs: FD110

PD240 Watercolor

(3 Credits)

An introduction to the transparent techniques of watercolor painting with an emphasis on the development of technical skills, color mixing and expressive use of the medium; development of a personal approach to the use of the medium culminating in a series of personally directed works. Studio elective. Offered dependent on demand. Pre-reqs: FD110

PD300 Collage/Mixed Media

(3 Credits)

An investigation of the use of multiple mediums within a single image. The purpose of this course is to gain an understanding of how various materials can affect the appearance, content and meaning of images. Precedents range from Picasso and Braque’s initial experiments with paper collage to contemporary ideas concerning the use of mixed media, with an emphasis on series work and material experimentation. Painting/Drawing major requirement. Offered in the Spring semester. Pre-reqs: FD110 and PD230

PD310 Contemporary Concepts

(3 Credits)

Highlights many of the Modern and Post-Modern concerns underlying much of today’s contemporary art. Particular emphasis is given to students honing their critical and conceptual abilities, while increasing their technical proficiency with a range of media and processes. Students are urged to expand their familiarity with a variety of working methods, and to develop a personalized approach to art and art-making. Painting/Drawing major requirement. Offered in the Fall semester. Pre-reqs: PD220 and PD230

PD320 The Figure

(3 Credits)

Identifies the importance and central role that images of humans have played in the history of art. Working with the figure is not only about objective representation, but an implicit (sometimes explicit) confrontation with the self and other individuals. Like the Subjects classes, The Figure is less about technique or a set of rules and more about the human form as a source of imagery, information, content and meaning. Emphasis is on developing a personal understanding of working with and representing the human form. Painting/Drawing major and concentration requirement. Offered in the Spring semester. Pre-reqs: PD 200 and PD 220 and PD 230, or POI

PD333 Painting/Drawing Workshop

(3 Credits)

This course is intensely focused on the process of making work. Class time is spent on a small number of large works, emphasizing painting/drawing as an act of discovery of form and ideas. A premium is place on the student's ability to sustain involvement and patience over extended periods of time, to analyze formal relationships and to improvise solutions to problems that arise. Painting/Drawing major and concentration requirement. Pre-reqs: PD220 and PD230

PD400 Painting/Drawing Seminar

(3 Credits)

Develops a self-directed, disciplined studio practice. Students work with instructor on an individual basis to generate ideas and acquire appropriate skills with the goal of a more personal approach to art-making; complete a series of works stressing the relationship of form to content. Professional practices include studio research, writing an artist statement, resume and cover letter, developing a website and researching graduate or professional opportunities. Painting/Drawing major and concentration requirement. Offered in the Fall and Spring semester. Pre-reqs: 15 PD credits and senior standing, or POI

PD401 Painting/Drawing Seminar

(3 Credits)

Maintains a self-directed, disciplined studio practice. Students work with instructor on an individual basis to refine ideas and hone skills with the goal of an intense and personal approach to art-making; complete a body of related works that are formally sound and conceptually rigorous for senior presentation and thesis exhibition. Professional practices include studio research, professional web presence and grant, residency, or graduate school application. Offered in the Fall and Spring semester. Pre-reqs: PD400

PD601 Painting/Drawing Seminar 1

(3 Credits)

Students meet collectively to discuss their graduate work and the professional practices involved in being a professional and educator. Group critiques are scheduled to encourage interaction between students and readings are assigned to provide context to contemporary trends. Enrollment is required in each semester a grad student is enrolled in the MFA in Painting/Drawing program. Lectures concentrate on documentation and web materials necessary to be a relevant artist/professional. MFA in Painting/Drawing major requirement. Pre-reqs: Enrollment in the MFA in Painting/Drawing program

PD602 Painting/Drawing Seminar 2

(3 Credits)

Students meet collectively to discuss their graduate work and the professional practices involved in being a professional and educator. Group critiques are scheduled to encourage interaction between students and readings are assigned to provide context to contemporary trends. Enrollment is required in each semester a grad student is enrolled in the MFA in Painting/Drawing program. Lectures concentrate on grant and residency opportunities and their application processes. MFA in Painting/Drawing major requirement. Pre-reqs: PD601

PD651 Painting/Drawing Workshop 1

(3 Credits)

Working independently from a traditional course- based process and from the other MFA candidates, this course is self-directed study, each student conducting his/her own personal exploration of concept and technique in the illustration process under the guidance of the faculty advisors. Student should demonstrate a willingness to take risks in their investigations. While a consistent body of work is not required, an openness to experimentation and the ability to succeed should be evident. MFA in Painting/Drawing major requirement. Pre-reqs: Enrollment in the MFA in Painting/Drawing program

PD652 Painting/Drawing Workshop 2

(3 Credits)

Working independently from a traditional course- based process and from the other MFA candidates, this course is self-directed study, each student conducting his/her own personal exploration of concept and technique in the illustration process under the guidance of advisors. Student should be able to articulate the pertinent issues in the work and a finished, resolved piece will be presented at finals. MFA in Painting/Drawing major requirement. Pre-reqs: PD651

PD701 Painting/Drawing Seminar 3

(3 Credits)

Students meet collectively to discuss their graduate work and the professional practices involved in being a professional and educator. Group critiques are scheduled to encourage interaction between students and readings are assigned to provide context to contemporary trends. Enrollment is required in each semester a grad student is enrolled in the MFA in Painting/Drawing program. Lectures concentrate on the research and documentation involved in a career in academia. MFA in Painting/Drawing major requirement. Pre-reqs: PD602

PD702 Painting/Drawing Seminar 4

(3 Credits)

Students meet collectively to discuss their graduate work and the professional practices involved in being a professional and educator. Group critiques are scheduled to encourage interaction between students and readings are assigned to provide context to contemporary trends. Enrollment is required in each semester a grad student is enrolled in the MFA in Painting/Drawing program. Lectures concentrate on fellowship applications and presentation skills. MFA in Painting/Drawing major requirement. Pre-reqs: PD701

PD751 Painting/Drawing Workshop 3

(3 Credits)

Working independently from a traditional course- based process and from the other MFA candidates, this course is self-directed study, each student conducting his/her own personal exploration of concept and technique in illustration under the guidance of advisors. Students are required to apply for Advancement to Candidacy when he/she will be expected to present a draft of their thesis and finished series of work. MFA in Painting/Drawing major requirement. Pre-reqs: PD652

PD752 Painting/Drawing Workshop 4

(3 Credits)

Working independently from a traditional course- based process and from the other MFA candidates, this course is self-directed study, each student conducting his/her own personal exploration of concept and technique in the illustration process under the guidance of the faculty advisors. Student will present a body of work in the MFA Thesis exhibition and a written thesis paper that will articulate their intentions, conceptual, aesthetic and technical strength. MFA in Painting/Drawing major requirement. Pre-reqs: PD751

Photography

PH215 Black and White Film Photography

(3 Credits)

Working with 35mm black and white film, students learn the fundamentals of photography including exposure, developing, printing and presentation. Photography is presented as a tool to communicate concepts and visual style. Students learn how to interpret and discuss the visual language of photography. Photography major and concentration requirement; Offered fall and spring semesters. Pre-reqs: None

PH230 Digital Photography Workflow

(3 Credits)

Digital tools are used to broaden students’ ability to work with photography in contemporary contexts and processes. Photoshop, Lightroom and large format archival printing instruction allow students to manage, edit, manipulate and print their imagery. Photography major and concentration requirement. Pre-reqs: PH100, FD170

PH250 Beyond 35mm Photography

(3 Credits)

Photographic tools are expanded to include medium and large format cameras that allow students to print larger, fine prints. Digital workflow processes and digital medium format camera are introduced as tools for image and concept development. Photography major and concentration requirement. Spring semester. Pre-reqs: PH215

PH275 Social Documentary Photography

(3 Credits)

The photographic, personal and writing techniques necessary for creating a successful documentary photographic series are explored. Students create images driving by current events and engaging with the public. Students document a consistent group in a project that culminates in the self-publishing of a book. Photography major requirement. Offered every 3 semesters. Pre-reqs: PH250, (DM240)PH230

PH300 Experimental Photography

(3 Credits)

This studio course explores the photograph in contemporary art. Photography’s integral tie to light serves as the backbone of this course as it investigates the alternative and contemporary spaces used by photographic artists. Students learn advanced studio lighting skills as well as explore the extension of the photograph off the page and into the realm of installation, performance and projection. Digital and analog tools and skills blur as students are encouraged to experiment and challenge their ideas of what defines a photograph. Photography major and concentration requirement. Fall semester. Pre-reqs: PH230 and PH250

PH325 Studio Lighting

(3 Credits)

Studio lighting techniques are demonstrated as they apply to fine art, documentary and commercial photography. Technical instruction in strobe, continuous and creative light provide students with the tools to enhance their imagery and work in a broader field of professional photography. Photography major and concentration requirement. Spring semester. Pre-reqs: PH250

PH351 Alternative Photographic Processes

(3 Credits)

Nineteenth-century and experimental photographic processes are explored as contemporary tools to create imagery. Processes such as cyanotype, Van Dyke, salt printing, platinum/palladium and gum printing are explored to using drawing and digital techniques to develop concepts and imagery. Photo major requirement. Offered every 3 semesters. Cross-Listing: PM elective. Pre-reqs: For photo majors/concentrators: PH250; for non-majors/concentrators: DW200 or higher, PM200, PM220 or PT120

PH375 Photo Professional Practices 1

(3 Credits)

Through critique, discussions and critical reading, students develop a body of work and documentation that is created and edited throughout the semester. The body of work is used to apply for various postacademic opportunities such as fellowships, graduate schools and grants. Photography major and concentration requirement. Fall semester. Pre-reqs: PH300

PH399 Special Topics Course

(3 Credits)

Junior Level. Courses offered infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject in Photography that may be topical or of special interest. Several different topics may be offered per semester. A specific title will be used in each instance and will be apparent on the student transcript. Multiple offerings will be identified by the use of suffixes (A, B, C, etc). Photography Elective. Pre-reqs: offering specific

PH400 Photo Professional Practices 2

(3 Credits)

Equal parts seminar and studio in its approach, this senior level course incorporates discussions and readings focused on contemporary photobased artworks and the theoretical and critical developments in recent photographic art practices. In addition, this course helps prepare students to enter the professional art world and/or graduate school. Students develop a cohesive portfolio of photographic imagery and create a strategy for the presentation of their work. Photography major and concentration requirement. Spring semester. Pre-reqs: PH375 and Senior standing

PH601 Photography Seminar 1

(3 Credits)

Students meet collectively to discuss their graduate work and the professional practices involved in being a professional and educator. Group critiques are scheduled to encourage interaction between students and readings are assigned to provide context to contemporary trends. Enrollment is required in each semester a grad student is enrolled in the MFA in Photography program. Lectures concentrate on documentation and web materials necessary to be a relevant artist/professional. MFA in Photography major requirement. Pre-reqs: Enrollment in the MFA in Photography program

PH602 Photography Seminar 2

(3 Credits)

Students meet collectively to discuss their graduate work and the professional practices involved in being a professional and educator. Group critiques are scheduled to encourage interaction between students and readings are assigned to provide context to contemporary trends. Enrollment is required in each semester a grad student is enrolled in the MFA in Photography program. Lectures concentrate on grant and residency opportunities and their application processes. MFA in Photography major requirement. Pre-reqs: PH601

PH651 Photography Workshop 1

(3 Credits)

Working independently from a traditional course- based process and from the other MFA candidates, this course is self-directed study, each student conducting his/her own personal exploration of concept and technique in the illustration process under the guidance of the faculty advisors. Student should demonstrate a willingness to take risks in their investigations. While a consistent body of work is not required, an openness to experimentation and the ability to succeed should be evident. MFA in Photography major requirement. Pre-reqs: Enrollment in the MFA in Photography program

PH652 Photography Workshop 2

(3 Credits)

Working independently from a traditional course- based process and from the other MFA candidates, this course is self-directed study, each student conducting his/her own personal exploration of concept and technique in the illustration process under the guidance of advisors. Student should be able to articulate the pertinent issues in the work and a finished, resolved piece will be presented at finals. MFA in Photography major requirement. Pre-reqs: PH651

PH701 Photography Seminar 3

(3 Credits)

Students meet collectively to discuss their graduate work and the professional practices involved in being a professional and educator. Group critiques are scheduled to encourage interaction between students and readings are assigned to provide context to contemporary trends. Enrollment is required in each semester a grad student is enrolled in the MFA in Photography program. Lectures concentrate on the research and documentation involved in a career in academia. MFA in Photography major requirement. Pre-reqs: PH602

PH702 Photography Seminar 4

(3 Credits)

Students meet collectively to discuss their graduate work and the professional practices involved in being a professional and educator. Group critiques are scheduled to encourage interaction between students and readings are assigned to provide context to contemporary trends. Enrollment is required in each semester a grad student is enrolled in the MFA in Photography program. Lectures concentrate on fellowship applications and presentation skills. MFA in Photography major requirement. Pre-reqs: PH701

PH751 Photography Workshop 3

(3 Credits)

Working independently from a traditional course- based process and from the other MFA candidates, this course is self-directed study, each student conducting his/her own personal exploration of concept and technique in illustration under the guidance of advisors. Students are required to apply for Advancement to Candidacy when he/she will be expected to present a draft of their thesis and finished series of work. MFA in Photography major requirement. Pre-reqs: PH652

PH752 Photography Workshop 4

(3 Credits)

Working independently from a traditional course- based process and from the other MFA candidates, this course is self-directed study, each student conducting his/her own personal exploration of concept and technique in the illustration process under the guidance of the faculty advisors. Student will present a body of work in the MFA Thesis exhibition and a written thesis paper that will articulate their intentions, conceptual, aesthetic and technical strength. MFA in Photography major requirement. Pre-reqs: PH751

Printmaking

PM215 Printmaking Fundamentals

(3 Credits)

The experience of printmaking is explored through historical techniques. Monotype, screenprinting and collograph techniques will be used by students to explore their concepts. Printmaking concentration requirement; fall semester. Pre-reqs: All Foundations coursework

PM240 Relief Printmaking

(3 Credits)

This course will cover techniques using woodcut and linocut in various approaches to create prints. The history of the processes will be discussed. Prints will be made with concepts that are developed throughout the course. Printmaking concentration requirement; fall semester. Pre-reqs: All Foundations coursework

PM260 Western Papermaking

(3 Credits)

The gap between ancient, non-mechanized hand papermaking practices and the modern-day, industrialized methods of making paper will be bridged by demonstration of techniques such as embossing, embedding and pulp painting. Assignments will focus on proper pulp preparation using fibers such as cotton, abaca and bamboo, sheet formation and how to use handmade paper as both a substrate for other media and as the medium itself. Printmaking Elective Option; fall semester. Pre-reqs: None

PM270 Eastern Papermaking

(3 Credits)

Students taking this class will learn to use plant fibers to make handmade papers using both Western and Eastern papermaking methods. The students will begin with an introduction to basic studio safety, operation, and maintenance. From there they will learn about different fibers, the qualities each fiber produces, and how to process them from raw form into sheets of paper. Students will be graded according to proper use of materials, studio cleanliness & safety, attendance & participation, craftsmanship, and creativity of final work. Students will create a portfolio of handmade paper work, learn traditional Japanese bookbinding methods, and create a final artist statement. Printmaking Elective Option; spring semester. Pre-reqs: None

PM280 Elements of Binding 1

(3 Credits)

Introduction to materials and techniques commonly used in bookbinding. This course is an initiation into fundamental binding forms, techniques, materials, and design. A series of cloth and paper bindings will be designed and made. While design and innovation will be stressed, the primary focus of the course will be upon learning technical skills. Projects to complete six bindings based on historical and contemporary models; sewing styles, board attachments, end-band types; non adhesive and case-bound structures, varied materials and binding styles, their effects on structure. Printmaking Elective Option; fall semester. Pre-reqs: None

PM310 Intaglio Printmaking

(3 Credits)

The students will learn basic techniques of intaglio like, line etching, aquatint, open bite, drypoint and possibly polymer plates.The history and conceptual development of images will be part of the course. Printmaking concentration requirement. Offered in the spring semester. Pre-reqs: All Foundations coursework

PM320 Lithography

(3 Credits)

This course will focus on the study of traditional and non toxic printmaking techniques and contemporary artist research. The students will develop craftsmanship of printmaking thru the design of individual project works. Printmaking concentration requirement. Offering depends on demand. Pre-reqs: PM215 or POI

PM410 Printmaking Seminar

(3 Credits)

Students develop a body of work around a single concept and vision. Individualized assignments and critiques are matched to each student’s ideas and work. Professional practices and communication skills relevant to the discipline are taught, preparing students for graduate education and encouraging the application of critical and visual thinking to their career paths in long-term, meaningful ways. Projects are relevant to the concerns of contemporary printmaking and the development of a print aesthetic. Printmaking concentration requirement. Offered in the spring. Pre-reqs: PM320 or PM310, and Senior standing

Sculpture

SC100 Sculpture 1

(3 Credits)

This technical processes class for majors and nonmajors introduces students to mold making theory and practice, basic materials, fabrication theory and practice as well as appropriate tool choice and use in each area. A basic understanding of joining methods is expected at the end of the semester. While focusing on skills building, exploration of materials in mold-making, casting, and fabrication is encouraged. Sculpture major requirement; Offered in the fall and spring semester. Pre-reqs: None

SC120 Ceramic Sculpture 1

(3 Credits)

This class introduces students to ceramic building techniques for the production of sculptural forms. Additive and subtractive methods are covered and used separately, and in combination depending on assignment and concept. Different surface finishes are also explored as students gain a basic understanding of clay, glaze, and firing principles. As the semester progresses and technical proficiencies strengthen, the content becomes the driving force of the majority of assignments. Sculpture major requirement; fall and spring semester. Pre-reqs: None

SC150 Metalsmithing 1

(3 Credits)

This is an introduction to the materials, tooling and processes involved in the creation of small sculptural units, body ornamentation and utilitarian objects. Processes experienced include lost wax casting, metal forming, surfacing and finishing options. Sculpture major requirement; fall and spring semester. Cross-listing: MT200; Pre-reqs: FD130

SC200 Sculpture 2

(3 Credits)

This course is a continuation of the technical exploration of SC100. Examination of materials, forming methods and ideas is supported with personal research focusing on contemporary approaches to sculptural ideas. Single object/idea development is stressed. Sculpture Elective option; fall and spring semester. Pre-reqs: SC100

SC220 Ceramic Sculpture 2

(3 Credits)

This class utilizes the building and surface finish skills obtained in Introduction to Ceramic Sculpture in conjunction with articulation and demonstration of content through writing. Students investigate concepts, materials, and techniques that inform and support the topic of their choosing. Work produced during the semester should demonstrate technical and conceptual control and specificity to build a cohesive body of work. Firing and glazing is further explored through direct experimentation according to individual technical and conceptual needs. Sculpture Elective option; fall and spring semester. Pre-reqs: SC120

SC235 Special Topics in Sculpture

(3 Credits)

A specialized area in Sculpture is studied. Topics are announced through semester course descriptions. The course may be repeated once when content changes. Sculpture Elective option. Pre-reqs: POI

SC240 Woodcarving

(3 Credits)

This course introduces novices to the basics of woodcarving and supplements intermediate and advanced carving skills. Projects are small scale and use commonly available wood cutting chisels and knives. Students develop all necessary skills for creating relief and in the round carvings from preparatory drawings. Sculpture Elective option. Pre-reqs: FD100

SC250 Metalsmithing 2

(3 Credits)

Course emphasis is on personal direction and expansion of process awareness. After an initial concept and process directed problem the student is responsible for a self-directed project. The goal of the project is for the student to advance their concept level, metalsmithing skills and awareness of the area. Processes experienced include advanced metal forming, repousse, chasing, tool making, joining and finishing. Sculpture Elective option. Pre-reqs: SC150

SC260 Sculptural Forms: Fiber Techniques for Sculpture

(3 Credits)

This course includes the study of low relief and three-dimensional form in materials other than stone, metal, plaster, or other rigid materials traditionally used for sculpture. Students use fiber, thread, fabric, plastic, and paper, with and without the structure of armature to explore problems in concepts and aesthetics. Sculpture Elective option. Pre-reqs: FD130, SC100 or SC170

SC270 Surface Design 2

(3 Credits)

This is a sequential course of study with four prerequisite intermediate levels leading to the advanced level. The technical vocabulary taught includes silkscreen, machine embroidery, garment construction, computer printing and others. Courses concentrate on furthering students' abilities to integrate material, process, form and content through fiber art. Sculpture Elective option. Pre-reqs: SC170

SC300 Sculpture 3

(3 Credits)

Students develop a multiple object language based on research of a personal interest. Personal histories and narratives form the basis of research leading to the production of multi-object sculpture. Student directed research and presentation form the basis for the development and production of mixed media installation projects. Sculpture Elective option. Pre-reqs: SC200

SC320 Ceramic Sculpture 3

(3 Credits)

Continuation of SC220. Sculpture Elective option. Pre-reqs: SC220

SC335 Special Topics in Sculpture

(3 Credits)

A specialized area in Sculpture is studied. Topics are announced through semester course descriptions. The course may be repeated once when content change. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

SC350 Metalsmithing 3

(3 Credits)

Continuation of SC250. Sculpture Elective option. Cross-listing: MT300; Pre-reqs: SC250

SC370 Surface Design 3

(3 Credits)

Continuation of SC270. Sculpture Elective option. Pre-reqs: SC270

SC375 Digital Sculpture

(3 Credits)

3D modeling programs are used to create digital files capable of controlling printing machines that translate virtual objects into tangible sculptures, allowing creative interactions between the hand/mind, computers, and machines. Digital Sculpture (mechanically assisted fabricating) explores 3D printing and other digital processes in the fine art industry by familiarizing students with prototyping that combines digital and analog building techniques. Sculpture Elective option. Pre-reqs: FD130, FD170

SC399 Special Topics Course

(3 Credits)

Junior Level. Courses offered infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject in Illustration that may be topical or of special interest. Several different topics may be offered per semester. A specific title will be used in each instance and will be apparent on the student transcript. Multiple offerings will be identified by the use of suffixes (A, B, C, etc). Sculpture Elective. Pre-reqs: offering specific

SC400 Sculpture 4

(3 Credits)

In this idea oriented class, personal communication and expression are explored through proposal-based projects, including preparation for the senior exhibition, and photo documentation of the senior portfolio. Sculpture Elective option. Pre-reqs: SC300

SC405 Sculpture 5

(3 Credits)

Continuation of SC400. Sculpture Elective option. Pre-reqs: SC400

SC420 Ceramic Sculpture 4

(3 Credits)

Students are guided through their own investigation of concepts, materials and techniques. Emphasis is on research and individual artistic development. Students are required to set up a semester problem of their own choosing. Sculpture Elective option. Pre-reqs: SC320

SC425 Ceramic Sculpture 5

(3 Credits)

Continuation of SC420. Sculpture Elective option. Pre-reqs: SC420

SC435 Special Topics in Sculpture

(3 Credits)

A specialized area in Sculpture is studied. Topics are announced through semester course descriptions. The course may be repeated once when content changes. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

SC450 Metalsmithing 4

(3 Credits)

Continuation of SC350. Sculpture Elective option. Pre-reqs: SC350

SC455 Metalsmithing 5

(3 Credits)

Continuation of SC450. Sculpture Elective option. Pre-reqs: SC450

SC470 Surface Design 4

(3 Credits)

Continuation of SC370. Sculpture Elective option. Pre-reqs: SC370

Liberal Arts – General Ed

Art History

AH101 Survey of Art History, Prehistory to Medieval

(3 Credits)

This course surveys Western art chronologically from prehistory through the Medieval period. Students gain familiarity with movements, time periods, and individual works of art. Students learn to identify works of art, are introduced to art terminology, practice the fundamentals of visual analysis, and develop the ability to analyze the content and contexts of works of art. A discussion of non-Western traditions may be included. Participation in a weekly discussion section is a requirement of this course. It is highly recommended that students complete AH101 prior to enrolling in AH102. Liberal Arts Foundation requirement; fall and spring semester. Pre-reqs: None; Co-req: AH101 Discussion

AH102 Survey of Art History, Renaissance to Contemporary

(3 Credits)

This course surveys Western art chronologically from the Renaissance period to the present day. Students gain familiarity with movements, time periods, and individual artists. Students learn to identify works of art, are introduced to art terminology, practice the fundamentals of visual analysis, and develop the ability to analyze the content and contexts of works of art. A discussion of non-Western traditions may be included. This course is Permission of Registrar only, and is restricted to transfer students or freshmen matriculating during the spring semester with earned credits equivalent to AH101, students who must retake AH102 (AH150) during the fall semester, or other students that the Registrar or instructor deem to have legitimate reasons for taking this course. It is highly recommended that students complete AH101 prior to enrolling in AH102. Liberal Arts Foundation requirement; fall and spring semester. Pre-reqs: highly recommended students take AH101 prior; Co-req: AH102 Discussion

AH200 Renaissance Art

(3 Credits)

This course will focus on the architecture, sculpture, and painting of the Italian peninsula and northern Europe from the early Renaissance through the sixteenth century. Students will consider the relationship of Renaissance stylistic conventions to those of the past, changing roles of artists and patrons, and the increasing interest in naturalistic representation. Art History Elective. Pre-reqs: AH101, AH102, HU101, HU102

AH210 Baroque Art

(3 Credits)

The course will explore the development of the Baroque style in painting, sculpture, and architecture from the late sixteenth century through the early eighteenth. Works by artists such as Caravaggio, Bernini, Velasquez, Rubens, and Rembrandt will be covered, and some consideration might be given to the spread of this dynamic style beyond the boundaries of Europe. Art History Elective. Pre-reqs: AH101, AH102, HU101, HU102

AH220 Ancient Mediterranean Art

(3 Credits)

This course explores the artistic and architectural developments and interactions of several neighboring cultures in the eastern Mediterranean, including the Egyptian, Sumerian, Assyrian, Persian, Minoan, and Mycenean civilizations. Jewelry and other luxury objects, as well as painting, sculpture, and architecture will be covered, with an emphasis on the conventions and traditions shared between these cultural groups. Art History Elective. Pre-reqs: AH101, AH102, HU101, HU102

AH222 The Classical World: Greece and Rome

(3 Credits)

This course surveys the art and architecture of Ancient Greece and Rome. Architecture and architectural sculpture, figural sculpture, portraiture, and painting on ceramic ware and walls will be explored, with reference to the major political and cultural developments that accompanied achievements in the visual arts. Students will also consider the traditions from which these civilizations grew, and the enduring impact of Greece and Rome on the visual culture of the West. Art History Elective. Pre-reqs: AH101, AH102, HU101, HU102

AH225 19th Century Art

(3 Credits)

This course surveys Western art from the French Revolution to the turn of the twentieth century. Discussion focuses on Neo-Classicism, Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, and Post-Impressionism and locates these stylistic developments within the context of social and cultural revolutions. Further topics include the development of landscape painting, Orientalism and “Primitivism” in the visual arts, the invention of photography, the creation of the avant-garde identity, and the beginnings of Modernism. Art History Elective. Pre-reqs: AH101, AH102, HU101, HU102

AH226 Medieval Art and Architecture: an introduction

(3 Credits)

This course surveys the art and architecture of the medieval period, from the end of the Roman Empire to the start of the Protestant Reformation, across Europe and the Mediterranean region. At an introductory level, the course explores visual media including illustrated books, wall painting, sculpture, metalwork, stained glass, and textiles. Periods and regions covered include Late Antique, Insular, Carolingian, Anglo-Saxon, Byzantine, Romanesque, and Gothic. Art History Elective. Pre-reqs: AH101, AH102, HU101, HU102

AH227 Modernism and the Avant-Garde

(3 Credits)

This course is an introduction to major movements and artists, primarily European and American, from the late-nineteenth century to WWII. Emphasis is on the fundamental tenets of Modernist art and the various manifestations of the avant-garde. Course topics include the relation of politics and avantgarde culture, “Primitivism” in the visual arts, gender and identity, the development of abstraction and its meanings, the role of photography and mechanization, and the rise of modern consumer culture. Art History Elective. Pre-reqs: AH101, AH102, HU101, HU102

AH229 The Islamic World: Art, Architecture, and Visual Culture

(3 Credits)

This introductory course surveys the art and architecture of the Islamic world, from its inception in the early 7th century through the rise of the Ottoman Empire in the 15th century. Students will explore a variety of media, including illustrated books, textiles, ceramics, metalwork, and mosaics, produced in the Middle East, Central Asia, North Africa, and Spain. Art History Elective. Pre-reqs: AH101, AH102, HU101, HU102

AH230 Art Since World War II

(3 Credits)

This course is an exploration of global visual arts and theory since World War II to the present with a focus on Western culture. Discussion moves chronologically and thematically through various movements and trends, exploring internationally shared artistic practices and goals. Topics include Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, Minimalism, Process Art, Land Art, Conceptual Art, Body and Performance Art, and Installation Art, with particular attention given to themes of gender and identity, feminism, multiculturalism, environmental awareness and issues of media and technology. Art History Elective. Pre-reqs: AH101, AH102, HU101, HU102

AH248 Survey of Asian Art

(3 Credits)

This course introduces the distinctive, yet inter-related, artistic traditions of South, Southeast Asia, and East Asia from the prehistoric to early modern period. Through the studies of selected artworks and architectural sites, this course provides a contextual framework for understanding Asian art. The class topics and discussions are organized to encourage students to develop skills and confidence in analyzing, describing, and comparing visual forms from various regions in Asia. Art History Elective. Pre-reqs: AH101, AH102, HU101, HU102

AH250 History of Design

(3 Credits)

This course examines the historical and contemporary visual languages of design in the areas of graphic, wood, ceramic, glass, textile, metal, and landscape design. Course material addresses topics such as the pioneers of modern design, the technological evolution of visual communication, and the influence of art, culture and industry upon design trends. Art History Elective. Pre-reqs: AH101, AH102, HU101, HU102

AH270 Survey of American Art

(3 Credits)

This survey explores art of the United States from the colonial era to 1945, focusing primarily on Europeaninfluenced painting, sculpture, and architecture throughout the seventeenth, eighteenth, nineteenth, and early twentieth centuries. Themes that receive special attention may include material culture, patronage, nationalism, images of and artistic production by Native and African Americans, and the arrival, reception, and subsequent flowering of Modernism in America. Art History Elective. Pre-reqs: AH101, AH102, HU101, HU102

AH299 Special Topics Course

(3 Credits)

Sophomore Level. Courses offered infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject in Art History that may be topical or of special interest. Several different topics may be offered per semester. A specific title will be used in each instance and will be apparent on the student transcript. Multiple offerings will be identified by the use of suffixes (A, B, C, etc). Art History Elective. Pre-reqs: AH101, AH102, HU101, HU102

AH304 History of Japanese Art

(3 Credits)

This course introduces the visual language, artistic traditions and innovative practices of the Japanese culture. Through various art forms such as screens, temples, shrines, ceramics used in the tea ceremony, scrolls, and woodblock prints, students explore Japan’s uniqueness and ingenuity in its artistic expressions. Key topics include the modes of adaptation of foreign ideas, the court art and its taste as seen in handscroll paintings (emakimono), the flourishing of a Bourgeois culture, encounters with the West, and more. Art History Elective. Pre-reqs: AH101, AH102, HU101, HU102

AH305 History of Indian Art

(3 Credits)

A chronological survey of art and architecture in India from the Indus Valley civilization to the modern era. The course explores India’s diverse religious and cultural traditions through three major religious traditions (Hinduism, Buddhism, and Islam) and their exquisite monuments constructed in honor of their gods. Art History Elective. Pre-reqs: AH101, AH102, HU101, HU102

AH306 History of Chinese Art

(3 Credits)

This introductory course examines and analyzes selected works of art and architecture in China. Through discussion of a variety of topics about Chinese art and architecture from the jade-carving and bronze-casting culture to modern art, students acquire in-depth understanding of China’s society, politics, culture and people. Topics include funerary rituals, imperial ideology, state patronage of Buddhism, elite life and arts, popular arts, ideological control of the arts in the 20th century, and more. Art History Elective. Pre-reqs: AH101, AH102, HU101, HU102

AH308 Art and Architecture of Mexico

(3 Credits)

This course traces the major art-producing cultures of Mesoamerica beginning with the Olmec and continuing with the Maya, the peoples of Oaxaca, and the Aztec Empire. Following the Conquest the influence of Pre-Hispanic art traditions is traced in the Colonial and Modern periods, including such leaders as Rivera, Kahlo, and Barragan. Art History Elective. Pre-reqs: AH101, AH102, HU101, HU102

AH310 The Birth of Cinema

(3 Credits)

This course will study the development of cinema as a form of artistic expression and social practice during its first half century. Topics include early cinema, narrative form, the Hollywood studio system, German Expressionism, Soviet and European film and technological advances such as sound and color. This course requires a mandatory weekly film screening in addition to classroom sessions. Readings will accompany film screenings as a basis for discussion. Art History Elective. Pre-reqs: AH101, AH102, HU101, HU102

AH311 Cinema since World War II

(3 Credits)

This course will study major movements and directions in global cinema since the World War II, paying specific attention to cinema’s formal and economic responses to television and, later, new media. Topics include Italian Neorealism, film noir, the French New Wave, national cinemas in Asia, New Hollywood and independent cinema. This course requires a mandatory weekly film screening in addition to classroom sessions. Readings will accompany film screenings as a basis for discussion. Art History Elective. Pre-reqs: AH101, AH102, HU101, HU102

AH326 History of Photography

(3 Credits)

A survey of world photography, taking as its central concern the multiple purposes to which photography has been adapted since its discovery in the early nineteenth century. Although the relationship between photography and fine art is a central theme, this class also explores many other uses of the medium to better understand how photography is employed in a variety of cultural contexts. Art History Elective. Pre-reqs: AH101, AH102, HU101, HU102

AH329 American Art, 1865-1950

(3 Credits)

This class examines art in the United States from the end of the Civil War to the rise of Abstract Expressionism. We will study painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, illustration, design, and material culture produced by indigenous, native-born, immigrant, and expatriate American artists. Primary themes may include imagery of national unity, nativism, regionalism, and immigration; artistic interchange between America and Europe including modernism; African American artists and movements, especially the Harlem Renaissance; government patronage and the Great Depression; art by and about women; and the “end” of American Art. Art History Elective. Pre-reqs: AH101, AH102, HU101, HU102

AH331 Modern Architecture from Jefferson to WWII

(3 Credits)

This course traces trends and styles in Europe and the U.S. including Neoclassicism, Victorian eclecticism, Richardson, the skyscraper, Art Nouveau, Wright, California modern, the Bauhaus, and Art Deco. Planning concepts are discussed. Video and site visits may be offered. Art History Elective; fall semester. Pre-reqs: AH101, AH102, HU101, HU102

AH332 Modern Architecture from 1930 to the present

(3 Credits)

This course examines the developments in Europe and the Americas from the Great Depression to the present, including planning issues. Acceptance of the International Style led to the Post-Modern reaction. An appreciation of the contribution of Johnson, Saarinen, Kahn, Pei, Gehry, and other leaders will be enhanced by video and site visits. Art History Elective. Pre-reqs: AH101, AH102, HU101, HU102

AH350 Design and Culture in the Fifties

(3 Credits)

This course surveys architecture and other media in relation to post-World War II trends such as the Cold War, the Baby Boom, civil rights, consumerism, conformism, and changing gender roles. Painting, product design, and graphic design are covered. Music, vintage video, and local artifacts bring the decade to life. Art History Elective. Pre-reqs: AH101, AH102, HU101, HU102

AH360 The Artist and the Era

(3 Credits)

Students in this course study a particular artist and cultural, leading to an understanding of how time and place condition creativity as well as the production of art and design. Artists such as Picasso, Duchamp, Eames, and Warhol have been covered in past semesters. Topics are announced through semester course descriptions. The course may be repeated when content changes. Art History Elective. Pre-reqs: AH101, AH102, HU101, HU102

AH370 American Art, 1492-1865

(3 Credits)

This class examines art in the American Colonies and the United States from colonial conquest to the end of the Civil War. While the main focus is European-influenced painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, and material culture, we will also explore the art of Native American and enslaved and free Africans. Primary themes may include the syncretic mixing of cultures in the American context; the use of art for revolutionary purposes; the development of arts institutions including museums and art schools; and representations of gender and race. Art History Elective. Pre-reqs: AH101, AH102, HU101, HU102

AH375 African-American Art

(3 Credits)

This course surveys the rich artistic production of people of African descent in the United States from the colonial era to the present. A central concern of the course is the cultural and artistic interchange between West and Central Africa, Europe, and America that created a distinctive artistic tradition and produced a wide range of visual culture including ceramics, furniture, textiles, architecture, painting, sculpture, photography, installation, and performance. The contrast between how African Americans represent themselves and how others represent them is an important theme. Art History Elective. Pre-reqs: AH101, AH102, HU101, HU102

AH380 Women in Art

(3 Credits)

This course will explore the roles women have played as artists, patrons, subjects, and critics of art. In addition to a historical survey of women artists, students will be asked to consider the roles of women throughout history and how these roles affected the availability of artistic training for women, the representation of women in art, feminist art criticism and theory, and contemporary post-feminist methodologies. Art History Elective. Pre-reqs: AH101, AH102, HU101, HU102

AH399 Special Topics Course

(3 Credits)

Junior Level. Courses offered infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject in Art History that may be topical or of special interest. Several different topics may be offered per semester. A specific title will be used in each instance and will be apparent on the student transcript. Multiple offerings will be identified by the use of suffixes (A, B, C, etc). Art History Elective. Pre-reqs: AH101, AH102, HU101, HU102

AH450 Art History Seminar

(3 Credits)

Students examine a specific area within art history through structured group discussion, research, and student presentations. Topics may be oriented chronologically, topically, geographically, or monographically, and are announced through semester course descriptions. May be repeated when course content changes. Additional prerequisites may be determined by the instructor. Art History Elective. Pre-reqs: AH101, AH102, HU101, HU102

AH499 Special Topics Course

(3 Credits)

Senior Level. Courses offered infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject in Art History that may be topical or of special interest. Several different topics may be offered per semester. A specific title will be used in each instance and will be apparent on the student transcript. Multiple offerings will be identified by the use of suffixes (A, B, C, etc). Art History Elective. Pre-reqs: AH101, AH102, HU101, HU102

Humanities

HU100 Developmental Writing

(3 Credits)

Coursework introduces the fundamental principles of reading comprehension and college-level writing. Course exercises and assignments are designed to build proficiency in basic grammar, punctuation, and usage. Assignments emphasize sentence and paragraph structure, organization, modes of description and narration, and lead to the development of a short essay. Course may serve as a prerequisite for Writing 1 if the student does not have an ACT English sub-score of at least 19, or SAT verbal score of at least 460. Fulfills a Liberal Arts Elective; fall and spring semester. Pre-reqs: ACT English sub-score of <19, or SAT verbal score of <460

HU101 Writing 1

(3 Credits)

This course introduces the critical reading and writing skills required for college-level work. Course readings and exercises expose students to a series of writing purposes and audiences. Writing assignments move from the personal essay to critical analysis to argument, with emphasis upon thesis development, support, organization, and use of standard English grammar. Students participate in all stages of the writing process including revision, outlining, and editing to improve content, organization, and style. Liberal Arts Foundation requirement; fall and spring semester. Pre-reqs: successful completion of HU090 or HU100, or ACT English sub-score of >19, or SAT verbal score of >460

HU102 Writing 2

(3 Credits)

Coursework builds from and refines the skills introduced in Writing 1 leading to proficiency in critical thinking and writing appropriate to the college and professional environment. Students further develop their skills in analytical, evaluative, and argumentative writing and gain exposure to library and online research strategies. Coursework includes practice in quoting, summarizing, and synthesizing ideas, and citing sources using both MLA and Chicago style documentation guidelines. Coursework culminates with a documented research paper. Liberal Arts Foundation requirement; fall and spring semester. Pre-reqs: HU101

HU200 Introduction to Philosophy

(3 Credits)

Students examine the primary works in the history of philosophy through critical reading of traditional philosophical problems drawn from the areas of metaphysics, theories of knowledge, philosophy of religion, and ethics. Fulfills a Liberal Arts Elective. Pre-reqs: AH101, AH102, HU101, HU102

HU203 Philosophy and Film

(3 Credits)

Students explore the development of major philosophical themes in classic and contemporary films from Europe, Asia, and the United States. Complementary readings in philosophical theory, including texts in Classical Greek Philosophy, Rationalism, Empiricism, Modernism, and Postmodernism inform the discussion. Fulfills a Liberal Arts Elective. Pre-reqs: HU101, HU102

HU205 Elementary Logic

(3 Credits)

Basic principles of reasoning allow students to organize and develop fundamental concepts of logic and information processing. Case studies facilitate the formulation and assessment of students’ own ideas. Fulfills the math/natural science requirement. Pre-reqs: HU101, HU102

HU210 Introduction to Ethics

(3 Credits)

An introduction to major ethical theories. Students analyze and discuss a variety of topical issues such as censorship, economic justice, racism, and sexism through a series of readings which present competing perspectives. Fulfills a Liberal Arts Elective. Pre-reqs: HU101, HU102

HU215 Literature Survey

(3 Credits)

An overview of an area of literature. The focus is on approaching literary texts critically and applying close reading skills to analyses. The course explores various genres of literature, including short stories, poetry, plays and novels in their cultural and historical context. Specific course topic will be announced through semester course descriptions. Fulfills the Literature requirement. Pre-reqs: HU101, HU102

HU231 US History to 1877

(3 Credits)

This course examines the economic, geographical, and social background of life in the United States from its discovery, through its colonization and independence, and finally, to its national crisis and reconstruction. Emphasis will be placed upon vital intellectual, cultural, political, and social movements that formed the foundations of the nation. In addition to a general textbook, primary documents expose students to firsthand historical sources of American history. Fulfills a Liberal Arts Elective. Pre-reqs: HU101, HU102

HU232 U.S. History Since 1877

(3 Credits)

This course examines the economic, political, geographical and social background of life in the United States from the Civil War/Reconstruction era to present times. Emphasis is placed upon vital intellectual, cultural, political, and social movements that have shaped and continue to impact the current American scene. In addition to a general course textbook, , primary documents expose students to firsthand historical sources of American history. Fulfills a Liberal Arts Elective. Pre-reqs: HU101, HU102

HU240 Creative Writing: Fiction

(3 Credits)

Fiction writing explores the understanding and application of the elements of fiction as applied to the short story form. Working with a variety of fiction genres and styles, students learn how to analyze fiction for both athletics considerations and the production of meaning, as well as, how to craft original short stories. Fulfills a Liberal Arts Elective. Pre-reqs: HU101, HU102

HU241 Creative Writing: Poetry

(3 Credits)

This poetry course explores the understanding and application of the elements of poetry as applied to various poetic forms. Students participate in the art of close reading and analysis of poetry and poetic elements. In addition, students create original poetry with an emphasis on, and questioning of, constructions of meaning. Fulfills a Liberal Arts Elective. Pre-reqs: AH101, AH102, HU101, HU102

HU245 Survey of World Drama

(3 Credits)

The course is a comparative survey of foundational dramatic literatures that examines the cultural, political, economic, and social forces that collide on the stage. It explores a broad range of dramatic works from around the world with a focus on the dramatic presentation of ideas. Fulfills the Literature requirement. Pre-reqs: HU101, HU102

HU250 Introduction to Women’s Studies

(3 Credits)

An interdisciplinary examination of women with emphasis on how race, class, gender, sexuality, and other identity categories shape human experiences. It explores women’s experiences from a variety of social, political and economic institutions (e.g., family, marriage, work, religion, media) and within the framework of several academic disciplines (e.g., sociology, psychology, history, literature, art). Fulfills a Liberal Arts Elective. Pre-reqs: HU101, HU102

HU251 Introduction to African-American Studies

(3 Credits)

This course offers a survey of the historical events and ideas that have shaped African American history and identity, including slavery, emancipation, and the Civil Rights Movement. Course introduces students to the complexities of the African-American experience as represented through social and political participation and the creation of a body of intellectual work, literature, art, and music. Coursework aims to have students demonstrate an understanding of African American intellectual and cultural contributions to the Western world. Fulfills a Liberal Arts Elective. Pre-reqs: HU101, HU102

HU285 Southern Literature

(3 Credits)

A survey of the rich tradition of southern literature. The course explores how the South is imagined by Southern writers and focuses on the ways that they have chosen to write about the South. It considers the forces that shape its regional literary identity within the larger national contexts of the United States. Southern history, family and community, racial tension and social class, the use of the Southern dialect, and lastly the intersection of race, class, gender and region will be discussed. Fulfills the Literature requirement. Pre-reqs: HU101, HU102

HU292 Survey of American Popular Music

(3 Credits)

This course examines the evolution of musics that originated in Africa, Europe, the Caribbean, and Latin America, into a uniquely American sound. Students may study a variety of musical forms including folk styles, gospel, blues, country, jazz, rock and roll, and hip hop. Themes may also include technologies of musical production and distribution, commercialization, globalization, authenticity, and issues of race, class, and gender. Regional and Memphis music are important case studies. Fulfills a Liberal Arts Elective. Pre-reqs: HU101, HU102

HU295 French I

(3 Credits)

French I is a basic introduction to the French language with a focus on “survival” French, cultural awareness and travel “savoir faire.” All four domains of listening, speaking, reading and writing are presented. A variety of activities provide for an immersion-style learning atmosphere. Differentiated instruction is the key to maximizing the engagement of students combining lectures, individual and group work, presentations, and projects. Fulfills a Liberal Arts Elective. Pre-reqs: HU101, HU102

HU299 Special Topics Course

(3 Credits)

Sophomore Level. Courses offered infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject in Humanities may be topical or of special interest. Several different topics may be offered per semester. A specific title will be used in each instance and will be apparent on the student transcript. Multiple offerings will be identified by the use of suffixes (A, B, C, etc). Liberal Arts Elective. Pre-reqs: HU101, HU102

HU310 Creative Writing: Narrative Non-Fiction

(3 Credits)

Narrative Non- Fiction explores the intersection between non-fiction and fiction, between factual reporting and creative writing, between the empirical world and the personal experience. Utilizing styles, techniques, & elements from both genres, students develop strategies for discovering and revealing multiple truths about the world and the lived experience of the people in it. Fulfills a Liberal Arts Elective. Pre-reqs: HU101, HU102

HU341 The Human and the Divine

(3 Credits)

Students encounter the philosophical, religious, and literary traditions of the Middle East and the West through primary texts that analyze the foundational, mythological worldviews of Sumer, Babylonia, Egypt, Persia, and Greece, along with the historical background and cultural influences of Judaism and Christianity. Primary source material includes texts from the Gnostic gospels and the Dead Sea Scrolls. Fulfills a Liberal Arts Elective. Pre-reqs: HU101, HU102

HU350 Text and Image

(3 Credits)

Students discuss the complex relationship between visual and verbal texts drawing on a critical reading of foundational texts in the field. A research project focused on iconology—the close reading and interpretation of visual imagery—allows students to apply the themes of the course. Fulfills a Liberal Arts Elective. Pre-reqs: AH101, AH102, HU101, HU102

HU360 Modern Literature

(3 Credits)

This course offers a close examination of the literature and culture of the Modernist period. The focus is on particular experiments, movements, and extensions from American expatriate writers to the Surrealists and Avant-Garde movements to the Harlem Renaissance and Magical Realism. The course may also include the philosophical underpinnings of Modernism from Symbolism and Structuralism to Existentialism and Poststructuralism. Fulfills a Liberal Arts Elective. Pre-reqs: HU101, HU102

HU361 Asian-American Literature

(3 Credits)

An introduction to Asian American Literature. It explores selected novels, poems and short stories written by major Asian American writers. Placing the texts in a social and historical context, the course considers changing meanings of “Asia” and “Asian America.” How were these categories imagined by different writers through time? The course is also concerned with distinct voices, innovative writing styles as well as prevalent themes in representative Asian American literature. Fulfills the Literature requirement. Pre-reqs: HU101, HU102

HU362 African-American Literature

(3 Credits)

An introduction to African American literature. The course examines a number of genres such as poetry, fiction, short stories, autobiography, and speech written by African American writers. It considers the historical, socio-political and cultural forces that helped to shape the African American experience. The focus is on how various social and intellectual milieus have created new thematic concerns as well as innovative forms of African American writing. Fulfills the Literature requirement. Pre-reqs: HU101, HU102

HU363 Women’s Literature

(3 Credits)

An exploration of the rich legacy of literary works by women with attention to essential questions. How do gender, race, and class influence literary production and interpretation? How have social attitudes shaped perceptions of women in literature and women's perceptions of themselves? In what sorts of voices and texts have women resisted the political, literary, or social status quo? The course examines literary works written by women who come from diverse social, political, cultural, and economic perspectives. Fulfills the Literature requirement. Pre-reqs: HU101, HU102

HU368 Contemporary Novel

(3 Credits)

Works by a diverse group of writers published after 1945. The course texts reflect a variety of cultural backgrounds and points of view, and they represent a variety of narrative tones, style, and structure. The course explores the formal and thematic features of the texts, with attention to innovations in the novel as a literary form and the ways in which writers engage with their historical and cultural context. Fulfills the Literature requirement. Pre-reqs: HU101, HU102

HU369 Fantasy and Science Fiction Literature

(3 Credits)

Examines the most imaginative of the fictional genres from its roots in myth to modern concepts of technology, and focuses on themes such as dystopian/utopian visions of society, man’s relationship with the divine, alien contact, and man’s role in an ever-changing technological landscape. The course emphasizes careful reading, analysis, and interpretations of the works, both short fiction and novels, and employs as tools of evaluation critical thinking, class discussion, and writing. Fulfills the Literature requirement. Pre-reqs: HU101, HU102

HU370 Critical Writing

(3 Credits)

This course builds upon skills gained in freshman composition and is designed for students seeking to improve their expository writing beyond the introductory level. Coursework includes advanced work in textual analysis, writing an argument, independent research, frequent student-teacher conferences, and further practice in revision and peer editing. Students will demonstrate a sophisticated use of source material and the ability to organize, edit, and revise their own prose with the goal of effectively applying these writing strategies beyond the course. Fulfills a Liberal Arts Elective. Pre-reqs: HU101, HU102

HU380 Women’s Studies: Gender, Race, Class, and Sexuality

(3 Credits)

An interdisciplinary course focusing on the critical study of how gender intersects with sexuality, race, ethnicity, and class. It analyzes relations of power and privilege within contemporary US society. The course serves as an introduction to critical social theories informing the gender, race, sexuality, and class studies. Fulfills a Liberal Arts Elective. Pre-reqs: HU101, HU102

HU387 Horror Literature

(3 Credits)

Traces the development of the genre from its roots in the Gothic of the 18th and 19th centuries to its evolution into the modern horror tale in the 20th century, and focuses on themes such as the haunted house, the vampire, the monster, and the demon. The course emphasizes careful reading, analysis, and interpretations of the works, both short fiction and novels, and employs as tools of evaluation critical thinking, class discussion, and writing. Fulfills the Literature requirement. Pre-reqs: HU101, HU102

HU388 Gothic Literature

(3 Credits)

Provides an overview of this popular and influential genre and examines its development, primarily in the form of the novel, from the 18th century to the present, and focuses on themes such as the quest for forbidden knowledge, the fear of female sexuality, the curse, and the supernatural. The course emphasizes careful reading, analysis, and interpretations of the works and employs as tools of evaluation critical thinking, class discussion, and writing. Fulfills the Literature requirement. Pre-reqs: HU101, HU102

HU399 Special Topics Course

(3 Credits)

Junior Level. Courses offered infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject in Humanities may be topical or of special interest. Several different topics may be offered per semester. A specific title will be used in each instance and will be apparent on the student transcript. Multiple offerings will be identified by the use of suffixes (A, B, C, etc). Liberal Arts Elective. Pre-reqs: HU101, HU102

HU410 Aesthetics

(3 Credits)

This course examines major questions in Western aesthetic theory from Plato to the present by examining the development of philosophy concerning themes including the art object, image and truth, creativity, beauty, genius, and the influence of technology upon the arts. Fulfills a Liberal Arts Elective. Pre-reqs: HU101, HU102

HU499 Special Topics Course

(3 Credits)

Senior Level. Courses offered infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject in Humanities may be topical or of special interest. Several different topics may be offered per semester. A specific title will be used in each instance and will be apparent on the student transcript. Multiple offerings will be identified by the use of suffixes (A, B, C, etc). Liberal Arts Elective. Pre-reqs: HU101, HU102

HU699 Special Topics Course

(3 Credits)

Graduate Level. Courses offered infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject in Humanities may be topical or of special interest. Several different topics may be offered per semester. A specific title will be used in each instance and will be apparent on the student transcript. Multiple offerings will be identified by the use of suffixes (A, B, C, etc). Graduate level Liberal Arts Elective. Pre-reqs: Graduate Standing

Mathematics/Natural Sciences

MA165 Essential Mathematics

(3 Credits)

This course explores why basic mathematics operations work as they do, as well as how these operations are performed. Topics include operations with fractions, decimals, percents, ratio and proportion, powers and roots, systems of measurement, and elementary and coordinate geometry. Connections with consumer math are explored in topics such as simple and compound interest, banking, and buying and owning a car and a home. Fulfills the Math/Natural Science requirement. Pre-reqs: None

MA211 Mathematics in Music

(3 Credits)

Music and Mathematics are connected in fundamental ways, and understanding these connections helps you appreciate both, even if you have no special ability in either field. In this course, you discover how mathematics is involved in making music by learning about harmony, rhythm, tones and tunings by the ancient Greeks, mathematical patterns in musical compositions, and the artistic attributes of mathematics. Fulfills the Math/Natural Science requirement. Pre-reqs: None

MA222 Geometry in the Arts

(3 Credits)

This course is a study of topics in geometry with examples of its historical application to the arts. The emphasis is on geometric concepts. The course includes all the topics necessary for a solid foundation in geometry—plane, solid and fractal. It goes beyond the traditional geometry course by delving into the history of geometric ideas, the mathematicians who developed them, the symbolism of geometric figures and the influence of geometry in the arts and architecture. Pre-reqs: HU101, HU102

MA223 Personal Finance

(3 Credits)

This course introduces students to concepts and practices used to successfully manage personal finances. The course teaches students how to use the practical knowledge necessary for budgeting, managing finances, investing and saving, using credit wisely, making informed decisions on housing, automobiles, insurance, and retirement, as well as helping the students understand basic consumer rights and responsibilities. Fulfills the Math/Natural Science requirement or a Liberal Arts elective. Pre-reqs: HU101, HU102

NS221 Human Evolution

(3 Credits)

This course provides a broad perspective on what it means to be a human being and how our species fits into the wider biological framework. Topics include evolution theory (including common misconceptions), modern human variations and adaptations, and the range of human behavioral and biological diversity. Fulfills the Math/Natural Science requirement. Pre-reqs: None

NS265 Environmental Studies

(3 Credits)

Students explore the concept of the eco-system and its relevance to scientific, cultural, and social issues, as well as an examination of such topics as global systems, organisms, scarcity, environmental law, and environmental art. Assignments may include an environmental conservation project. Fulfills the Math/Natural Science requirement. Pre-reqs: None

NS299 Special Topics Course

(3 Credits)

Sophomore Level. Courses offered infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject in Natural Sciences may be topical or of special interest. Several different topics may be offered per semester. A specific title will be used in each instance and will be apparent on the student transcript. Multiple offerings will be identified by the use of suffixes (A, B, C, etc). Fulfills Mathematics/Natural Science requirement or Liberal Arts elective. Pre-reqs: AH101, AH102, HU101, HU102

NS310 Anatomy and Physiology

(3 Credits)

Students examine the structure and function of the human body and relationships between the musculoskeletal, nervous, cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Overall goals of the course include an understanding of how the body works, a knowledge of anatomical and medical terminology and its application, and an appreciation for the elegance of form and function. Fulfills the Math/Natural Science requirement. Pre-reqs: None

NS499 Special Topics Course

(3 Credits)

Senior Level. Courses offered infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject in Natural Sciences may be topical or of special interest. Several different topics may be offered per semester. A specific title will be used in each instance and will be apparent on the student transcript. Multiple offerings will be identified by the use of suffixes (A, B, C, etc). Fulfills Mathematics/Natural Science requirement or Liberal Arts elective. Pre-reqs: AH101, AH102, HU101, HU102

Social Sciences

SS223 Introduction to Sociology

(3 Credits)

An introduction to the sociological perspective. Sociology seeks to explain the origin and functioning of social behavior as it appears in such areas as the family, economic and political structures, systems of stratification, deviant behavior, cultural norms, and other areas of human social interaction. Students will be introduced to basic sociological terms, concepts, research, and theories. Fulfills the Social Science requirement. Pre-reqs: HU101, HU102

SS226 Introduction to Psychology

(3 Credits)

Students are introduced to the discipline of psychology as a science of behavior. Areas of study include biological aspects of psychology, learning, sensation, perception, personality, abnormal behavior, and social and developmental psychology. Fulfills the Social Science requirement. Pre-reqs: HU101, HU102

SS240 United States Politics

(3 Credits)

This course surveys the U.S. political system, looking at its major institutions, processes and actors. Students examine topics including our political foundations; federalism; public opinion and participation; interest groups; political parties; congressional, presidential and bureaucratic politics; the judiciary; and civil rights and liberties. An important theme of the course is the importance of electoral politics in the contemporary U.S. political context and the related normative debate over the appropriate role and level of popular influence in our democracy. Fulfills the Social Science requirement. Pre-reqs: HU101, HU102

SS275 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

(3 Credits)

This course is designed to introduce major concepts and methods in the study of culture. We will explore cross-cultural similarities and differences in beliefs, values, behaviors, technologies, subsistence, language, ideology, arts, social organization, and economic, political, and religious institutions. Students will gain insight into how anthropology contributes to the understanding of the human condition and how anthropological tools can be used to help us recognize where we fit into the global community. Fulfills the Social Science requirement. Pre-reqs: HU101, HU102

SS299 Special Topics Course

(3 Credits)

Sophomore Level. Courses offered infrequently to explore, in depth, a comparatively narrow subject in Social Sciences may be topical or of special interest. Several different topics may be offered per semester. A specific title will be used in each instance and will be apparent on the student transcript. Multiple offerings will be identified by the use of suffixes (A, B, C, etc). Fulfills the Social Science requirement or Liberal Arts elective. Pre-reqs: HU101, HU102

SS310 Sociology of the Family and Intimate Relationships

(3 Credits)

A survey of changes in family systems over the years. Areas of study include courtship, love, mate selection, and family problems. The course also examines cross-cultural comparisons and considers alternatives to current traditional family forms. Emphasis on the use of empirical evidence to evaluate popular beliefs. Fulfills the Social Science requirement. Pre-reqs: HU101, HU102

SS330 Abnormal Psychology

(3 Credits)

This courses is a survey of mental disorders, including their causes, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment. Emphasis on anxiety disorders, sexual disorders, dissociative disorders, personality disorders, cognitive disorders, mood disorders, and schizophrenia. Fulfills the Social Science requirement. Pre-reqs: HU101, HU102

SS345 World Mythologies

(3 Credits)

Students examine the myths and legends of various cultures, along with their accompanying imagery, from an anthropological perspective as illustrations of major recurring themes in the human experience as well as their connections to modern belief systems. Fulfills the Social Science requirement. Pre-reqs: HU101, HU102

SS375 Anthropology and Art

(3 Credits)

This course will survey the key debates that have shaped the anthropological study of art. Students will examine the production, use, social functions, and meaning of objects from indigenous artistic traditions, discuss the controversial category of the “primitive” in Western thought, and consider how ideas from anthropology can engage contemporary art. Fulfills the Social Science requirement. Pre-reqs: HU101, HU102

P2-Professional Practices

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